Skip to main content

Advertisement

Fig. 2 | Autoimmunity Highlights

Fig. 2

From: The immunofluorescence techniques in the diagnosis of endocrine autoimmune diseases

Fig. 2

Indirect IF on human unfixed gastric mucosa. a Pattern produced by a normal serum: the cells in the glands of the stomach are negative, the fluorescence is concentrated in the connective tissue. b Pattern produced by a serum of a patient with high titers of PCA: the reaction is positive with a diffuse pattern of cytoplasm of the cells scattered in the glands (parietal cells), while the chief cells are negative. c Pattern produced by a serum of a patient with low titers of PCA: the serum reacts as a diffuse pattern on the cytoplasm of the cells scattered in the glands (parietal cells), while the chief cells are negative. d Pattern produced by a serum of a patient with high titers of mitochondria Abs: the serum reacts to the parietal cells (rich in mitochondria) (pink arrow) with a major intensity and weakly the cytoplasm of chief cells having a minor concentration of mitochondria. e Pattern produced by a serum of a patient with high titers of anti-ribosomal Abs: the serum stains intensively the cytoplasm of the chief cells but it does not react with the cytoplasm of parietal cells (red arrow). f Pattern produced by a serum of a patient with high titers of anti-nuclear Abs: the serum stains the nuclei of all the cells of the gastric mucosa. In this case some nuclei show an aspect of comet (white arrow) (this pattern is indicative of antibody to double strained DNA)

Back to article page